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M97
Award in Assessment for Learning and Continuous Assessment

MQF Level: 6

ECTS Value: 3 ECTS

Duration: 6 Sessions

Contact Hours: 15

Self Study Hours: 24

Assessment Hours: 36

 

Course Description

Assessment is fundamental in the educational process and it drives teaching and learning. Assessment for Learning (AfL) is integral to learning and it focuses on the process of learning. It is done when teachers gather evidence of learning all the time during classroom practice. Successively, this evidence of learning is continuously used to adapt the teaching and gives suitable information as to where the learner stands in the learning process, and with effective scaffolding, learners will realise the next step in this journey. Consequently, AfL strategies and continuous assessment will help students become self-reflective and independent learners.

Entry Requirements

Applicants interested in following this programme are to satisfy one of the minimum eligibility criteria:

1. An awarded MATSEC Certificate (MQF Level 4), or equivalent; OR

2. A full MQF Level 4 qualification with a minimum of 120 ECTS, or equivalent; OR

3. Three subjects at Advanced Level (MQF 4) with two subjects at grade C or better and the third subject with a grade D or better.

Overall Objectives and Outcomes


By the end of this module, the learner will be able to:

Competences

a. Create a more efficient child-centred environment which will enable learners to become more independent and more critical thinkers;
b. Systematically identify where the students stand in their learning, where they need to go and how best to get there;
c. Engage students in discussions;
d. Devise effective questions;
e. Develop success criteria;
f. Provide effective feedback;
g. Self-assess.

Knowledge 

a. Define Assessment and the different purposes it has;
b. Identify systematically what is Growth and Fixed mindset;
c. Recognise the purpose of effective questioning and success criteria in the formative assessment process;
d. Explain and make use of the Blooms Taxanomy;
e. Value and communicate the purpose of effective feedback and the need of self/peer assessment.

Skills

a. Keep abreast with the key literature related to Continuous Assessment and how it can impact teaching and learning;
b. Identify better the learners’ needs by employing diverse assessment techniques such as discussions, debates, group work, presentations, learning journals and peer/self-assessment activities;
c. Critically select the right and appropriate strategies and techniques to reach all learners;
d. Describe different ways of giving feedback and identify their advantages and disadvantages

Mode of Delivery

This module adopts a blended approach to teaching and learning. Information related to the structure and delivery of the module may be accessed through the IfE Portal. For further details, kindly refer to the Teaching, Learning and Assessment Policy and Procedures found on the Institute for Education’s website.  

Assessment Methods

This programme adopts continuous and summative methods of assessment including assignments, online tasks, reflective journals, projects and video presentations. For further details, kindly refer to the Teaching, Learning and Assessment Policy and Procedures.

Certification

Upon successful completion of this module, course participants will be conferred an accredited certification. 

Further Learning Opportunities and Career Progression

Upon successful completion of this module, course participants may use certification conferred to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning for accredited programmes. Teachers may also use this certification in their application for accelerated progression.

Suggested Readings

Core Reading List
a) Assessment Reform Group. (2002). Assessment for Learning: 10 principles . ; Available at http://arg.educ.cam.ac.uk
b) Black, P. & Wiliam, D. (1998a) Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment, The Phi Delta Kappan, 80 (2), 139 -144, 146 -148.
c) Clarke, S. (2001) Unlocking Formative Assessment; Practical Strategies for enhancing pupils’ learning in the primary classroom. ; London: Hodder and Stoughton.
d) Gardner, J. (2009). AFL, Assessment for Learning, A Practical Guide. : CCEAA CCEA publication.
e) Grima, Joanne, Satariano, Anthony, Grima Jennifer, Curmi Cheryl, Galea Elisabeth. (2010). Assessment for Learning: Practical Guide in the Classroom. ; Institute for Education.

 

Supplementary Reading List

1) Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee C., Marshall, B., Wiliam, D. ( 2002). Working Inside the Black Box; Assessment for Learning in the Classroom, London: GL Assessment.
2) Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee C., Marshall, B., Wiliam, D. ( 2004). Working Inside the Black Box; Assessment for Learning in the Classroom, The Phi Delta Kappan, 86 (1), 8 -21.
3) Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee, C., Marshall, B. & Wiliam, D. (2003). Assessment for Learning. Putting it into Practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.
4) Cizek, G.J. (2010) An Introduction to Formative Assessment: History, Characteristics and Challenges in Andrade, H.L. and Cizek, G.J (eds.) Handbook of Formative Assessment, Routledge, New York, London: Taylor and Francis Group: pp.3 -17.
5) Clarke, S. (2005a) Formative Assessment in the Secondary School, London: Hodder Education.
6) Clarke, S. (2005b) Formative Assessment in Action, weaving the elements together, London: Hodder.
7) Clarke, S. (2008) Active learning through formative assessment, London: Hodder Education.
8) Davies, A. (2011) Making Classroom Assessment Work, 3rd edition, Connections Publishing: Canada.
9) Hannel, I. (2009) Insufficient questioning, The Phi Delta Kappan, 91(3), 65-69.
10) Kerry, T. (2009) Unlocking the door to learning: Differentiating so all can succeed, Curriculum Briefing, 7(2), 20-40.
11) Vogler, K. E. (2005) Improve your Verbal Questioning; The Clearing House: The H.W. Wilson Company, 79 (2), 98 -103.
12) Wiliam, D. (2005) Keeping learning on track: formative assessment and the regulation of learning. Paper presented at the 20th biennial meeting of the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers, Sydney: Australia.
13) Wiliam, D. (2005) Keeping learning on track: formative assessment and the regulation of learning. Paper presented at the 20th biennial meeting of the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers, Sydney: Australia.
14) Wiliam, D. (2006) Assessment for Learning, Why, what and how? In Oldroyd, R. (ed.) (2006) Excellence in Assessment, Assessment for Learning, Cambridge Assessment Network, Cambridge UK.
15) Wiliam, D. (2011a) What Assessment can and cannot do, Pedagogiska Magasinet (Swedish Educational Journal) Available on: http://www.dylanwiliam.net/
16) Wiliam, D. (2014) Formative assessment and contingency in the regulation of learning processes. Black, P., Harrison, C., Lee C., Marshall, B., Wiliam, D. ( 2002) Working Inside the Black Box; Assessment for Learning in the Classroom, London: GL Assessment.

 

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