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M54
Award in an Understanding of Career Guidance and Development

MQF Level: 7

ECTS Value: 3 ECTS

Duration: 4 Sessions

Contact Hours: 15

Self Study Hours: 36

Assessment Hours: 24

 

Course Description

This course has been developed in collaboration with the National Student Support Services for educators interested in career education and career guidance practice. This course aims to instil knowledge, skills and competence in the field of career guidance to educators who wish to become more professionally involved in this educational field.

Entry Requirements

Applicants interested in following this programme are to be in possession of a Bachelor’s degree (MQF 6 with a minimum of 180 ECTS, or equivalent).  

Overall Objectives and Outcomes

By the end of this module, the learner will be able to: 

a. Gain an understanding of the skills and competencies required in the career guidance field;

b. Understand the aims of career guidance programmes;

c. Demonstrate autonomy and take initiative in learning about the constantly evolving nature of employment labour market trends for the benefit of the client’s needs;

d. Understand how career guidance practitioners work within a multi-disciplinary team for the benefit of clients;

e. Understand how career guidance practitioners work with clients from multi-cultural environments and with diverse needs

Mode of Delivery

This module adopts a blended approach to teaching and learning. Information related to the structure and delivery of the module may be accessed through the IfE Portal. For further details, kindly refer to the Teaching, Learning and Assessment Policy and Procedures found on the Institute for Education’s website.  

Assessment Methods

This programme adopts continuous and summative methods of assessment including assignments, online tasks, reflective journals, projects and video presentations. For further details, kindly refer to the Teaching, Learning and Assessment Policy and Procedures.

Certification

Upon successful completion of this module, course participants will be conferred an accredited certification. 

Further Learning Opportunities and Career Progression

Upon successful completion of this module, course participants may use certification conferred to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning for accredited programmes. Teachers may also use this certification in their application for accelerated progression.

Suggested Readings

Core Reading List
1. Sharf. S. R. (2002) Applying Career Development Theory to Counselling, pp. 94- 112; pp 186 – 218; pp. 449– 479. Thomson, Brooks/ Cole.
2. Hooley, T., Watts, A.G., Sultana, R.G., & Neary, S. (2013) The ‘Blueprint’ framework for career management skills: a critical exploration, British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 41, 2, pp. 117-131.
3. Sultana, R. G. (2012) Learning career management skills in Europe: a critical review, Journal of Education and Work, 25, 2, pp. 225-248.
4. Sharf. S. R. (2002). Applying Career Development Theory to Counselling, pp. 242 – 246; pp. 279 – 304; pp. 335-373. Thomson, Brooks/ Cole.
5. A Strategic Plan for the Prevention of Early School Leaving in Malta, Ministry for Education and Employment, 2014. Available at: https://lifelonglearning.gov.mt/dbfile.aspx?id=47
6. Sultana, R. G. (2010) Career Guidance and Social Inclusion: A Challenge for Europe, Australian Journal of Career Development. Available at: https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Career+guidance+and+social+inclusion%3A+a+challenge+for+Europe.-a0224168354
7. Cedefop (2016). Labour market information and guidance. Luxembourg: Publications Office. Cedefop research paper; No 55. http://dx.doi.org/10.2801/72440
8. Job Plus Employability Index Report of 2015, Malta
9. NCHFE Employee Skills Gap Survey 2016, Malta
 
Supplementary Reading List

1. Moore, N. (2017). Competences of a Careers Advisor in the digital age, in H Košolová (ed.) The Diverse World of Career Guidance. Prague, EKS. pp. 10-12.
2. Hooley, T. (2017). Developing your career: harnessing the power of the internet for “digital career management”. Development and Learning in Organizations, 31, 1, pp. 9-11.
3. Thomsen, R. (2017). ‘Career Guidance in Communities: A Model for Reflexive Practice’. Derby: International Centre for Guidance Studies, University of Derby.
4. Koštálová, H. et al. (2017). The Diverse World of Career Guidance. Prague. EKS
5. Walsh, M. (2010). ‘Employers’ perceptions of transition programming for students with emotional disturbances. Journal of Employment Counseling, 47, 3, pp. 123-133.
6. Wehman, P., Sima, A.P., Ketchum, J., West, M. D., Chan, F. and Leucking, R. (2015). Predictors of successful transition from school to employment for youth with disabilities. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 25, 2, pp. 323-334.
7. European Disability Strategy 2010-2020: A renewed commitment to a barrier free Europe. Available at: http://eurlex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2010:0636:FIN:en:PDF
8. The Malta National Disability Strategy (2016). Available at: https://activeageing.gov.mt/en/Pages/Malta-National-Disability-Strategy.aspx.
9. Hooley, T., Hutchinson, J., Neary, S. (2016). Ensuring Quality in online career mentoring, British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 44, 1, pp. 26-41.
10. Moore, N. (2017). Competences of a Careers Advisor in the digital age, in H Košolová (ed.) The Diverse World of Career Guidance. Prague, EKS. pp. 10-12.
11. Hooley, T. (2017). Developing your career: harnessing the power of the internet for “digital career management”. Development and Learning in Organizations, 31, 1, pp. 9-11.
12. Cedefop (2015) Malta: Skills forecasts up to 2025 (http://www.cedefop.europa.eu/en/publications-and-resources/country-reports/malta-skillsforecasts-2025)

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